Bar chart compares various types of retirement assets between U.S. and English retirees.
Housing wealth differentiates English and U.S. retirement savings

June 19, 2017

Designing effective policy to influence household retirement-saving behavior requires a deeper understanding of household motivations for saving and retention of wealth, particularly at older ages. In their 2015 working paper, “Comparing Retirement Wealth Trajectories on Both Sides of the Pond,”…

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Study looks at how households adjust budgets to job loss

May 17, 2017

Common sense says that losing a job would have major effects on household budgets. Economic theory says that if a household is adequately insured, through unemployment benefits, savings, home equity, etc., it will be better able to adjust consumption and…

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Upcoming research on cognition & long-term care insurance featured in latest newsletter

May 11, 2017

Our spring newsletter is now online with coverage of the annual MRRC Workshop. bit.ly/2pCciAd 

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Figure four: Fraction of Early Retirees uninsured by income level medicaid expansion versus nonexpansion states from American Community Survey data
Health reform has reduced the number early retirees without health insurance

April 21, 2017

By age 64, more than half of all workers are retired despite the fact that Medicare doesn’t kick in for most of them until age 65. The decline of employer-sponsored health insurance for retirees means that many people who make…

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Building a better model of how retirement, health, and consumption interact

March 24, 2017

MRRC researchers John Karl Scholz and Ananth Seshadri recently built a model to look into how health and consumption intertwine, using an Euler equation to examine consumption in relation to utility. In this instance, consumption represents spending and health investments,…

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Researcher Q&A Part 2: Olivia S. Mitchell looks at why people do or don’t buy Long-Term Care Insurance

November 18, 2016

Here’s the second part of our discussion with MRRC researcher Olivia S. Mitchell on her 2015 project with Daniel Gottlieb, “Narrow Framing and Long-Term Care Insurance.” This has been edited for length and clarity. I think a lot of our readers are not…

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Researcher Q&A, Part 1: Olivia S. Mitchell looks at why people do or don’t buy Long-Term Care Insurance

November 18, 2016

We talked to MRRC researcher Olivia S. Mitchell about her 2015 project with Daniel Gottlieb, “Narrow Framing and Long-Term Care Insurance.” This two-part interview has been edited for length and clarity. What led you to look at whether people buy long-term care insurance…

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Researchers find that Social Security reform decreases Medicare spending

November 18, 2016

The existing literatures on Social Security and Medicare explore each of these significant allocations of federal budget in isolation. There has been no work to date on the manner in which these programs interact with one another. Did Social Security Amendment…

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More on ‘Couples’ and Singles’ Savings After Retirement’

November 18, 2016

In order to study the hypothetical effects of expanding Medicaid, Mariacristina De Nardi, Eric French, and John Bailey Jones (DFJ) have written a fairly detailed model to study household saving and dissaving (see previous post). To make that possible, they constructed a novel measure…

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Looking at ‘Couples’ and Singles’ Savings After Retirement’

November 18, 2016

There’s some debate in the United States about extending Medicaid to more people. Loosening criteria for means-tested public health care insurance such as Medicaid would allow more people to benefit from health care they may otherwise be unable to afford,…

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