Retirement: It’s a Family Affair

March 14, 2019

While research often focuses on the retirement bound individual or couple, few people live their lives with no outside influences. A parent’s desire to lighten a child’s burden could have a negative impact on the parent’s retirement security, and such…

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MRRC to become MRDRC (Michigan Retirement and Disability Research Center)

October 22, 2018

In September, Michigan Retirement Research Center (MRRC) was awarded its fifth five-year cooperative agreement renewal from the Social Security Administration. MRRC Director and Principle Investigator John Laitner explained that as part of the grant proposal, MRRC agreed to include disability…

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Making sense of health’s role in employment

September 18, 2018

Despite the growing number of studies and the increasing availability of detailed data, researchers haven’t developed a consensus on how health affects employment. This is partly explained by the wide variety in datasets (how they are collected, how they measure…

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Laboring longer: Second careers, unretirement, and bridge jobs keep older Americans at work

August 22, 2018

As the U.S. population ages, often in better health than our parents and grandparents, the notion of retirement is starting to evolve, and retirement paths have become as variable as ice cream flavors: One person may partake of the traditional…

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Bar chart shows percentage of couples eligible for Social Security Spousal Benefits by claimant age and couple type. Age 45-54 Age 55-64 Age 65+ Hetero married 46.1 53.5 52 Same-sex married male 36.2 47.8 45.5 Same-sex married female 37.9 46.3 51.8
To have and to hold: Researchers investigate how same-sex marriage might affect Social Security spousal benefits

June 7, 2018

June 26 marks the third anniversary of nationwide, legal same-sex marriage. The estimated 4 percent of the U.S. population that is lesbian, gay, or bisexual (LGB) can now benefit from the same legal status as married heterosexuals with all that…

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Are lifetime earnings a product of the times? Veterans who entered the civilian market in periods of high unemployment have lower earnings for over a decade, have lower levels of prospective Social Security wealth, and appear to delay retirement (perhaps to compensate for the negative effects experienced early in their careers), and have higher levels of family instability. These results suggest that young workers who entered the labor market during the Great Recession are likely to experience negative effects throughout the first phases of their career; indeed, some of the effects could influence today’s workers through retirement.
Tough timing: Study looks at veterans to pin down the long-term effects of entering the labor market during a recession

May 16, 2018

Previous research has found that young people entering the job market during a weak economy face lingering negative effects, earning less than workers who joined the labor market during, for example, a period of low unemployment. Such effects can last…

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MRRC Director John Laitner recaps the spring workshop

May 1, 2018

The Michigan Retirement Research Center held its annual researcher workshop on March 23 and 24, 2018. As in recent years, we used space at the Ross School of Business, at the University of Michigan. This workshop has only plenary sessions…

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Payroll Taxes

April 13, 2018

Reprise for Tax Day: Labor supply and payroll taxes With policymakers proposing payroll tax reform with a view to promote the solvency of Social Security and Medicare, the research community has turned to examining whether changes to payroll taxes alone…

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MRRC Director John Laitner previews 2017 key findings

March 7, 2018

The 2018 Winter Newsletter includes brief summaries of findings from a dozen new MRRC working papers. The projects illustrate two principal themes of our research effort: They make in-depth use of up-to-date data sources to test and quantify our understanding…

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More retirement planning with Mike and Mary

February 13, 2018

  In our last exciting episode, Mike and Mary decided to keep working rather than take early retirement at age 62. They realized that they were behind in their retirement savings goals and likely to live longer than average given…

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